Saturday, July 4, 2015

Laura's Bookshelf: God Particles

This morning, I was looking for a friend's poetry chapbook.

(The friend is Danuta E. Kosk-Kosicka, this year's Harriss Poetry Prize winner. She has a reading at LitMore on Monday evening and has asked a few friends, including me, to choose one or two of her poems to read.)

I checked the stack on my dining room table in my satellite office. I checked both bookshelves and the bedside table in my bedroom. It was until I started pulling down the three large stacks of books on top of the old wardrobe, waking my husband, that I began to confront the truth.

I have a book problem. Except not really a problem, I said out loud, because they are books. This was the point where my half-asleep husband started to laugh. And I said, What I really need is more bookshelves.

I finally located the book, Oblige the Light. (Not on the shelves above my desk, but on the wall of shelves opposite, which is dedicated, mainly, to poetry.)

The cover image is a photograph by the author,
poet and artist Danuta Kosk-Kosicka.
You can read my interview with Danka here.
Occasionally, when I have fits of book madness like this, I declare to my husband: I am going to read every book in this house before I make another trip to the library or buy another book! And then I remember that my children both have shelves and stacks of their own and their rooms are, technically, in this house, which extends my declaration by at least a hundred titles, I'm sure.

Reading is more fun, and the poems and narratives more deeply experienced, when we share the stories and concepts in a book with one another. Since I plan to put a dent in our home library this summer, I will post about the books as I go, with special attention to books of poetry. We'll see how far I get in the Laura's Bookshelf series.

First up is God Particles, by Thomas Lux. 

Find it at IndieBound.
Lux is a mentor and friend of my mentor and friend, the poet and physician Michael Salcman (you can read my interview with Michael here). Michael introduced us at CityLit Festival when Lux was a headline speaker in 2012. I was familiar with a few of his poems, but hearing him speak and perform his poems, I wanted to read more. I bought God Particles, had it signed, and dipped in from time to time. It became my nightly poem book a few months ago. 



I love the sense of humor in these poems, how they dip into the surreal. Trains of thought veer off the rails, but never end in a tangled wreck of ideas. Instead, they travel somewhere unexpected and often profound.

Here is Lux reading one of my favorite poems from the book, "The Happy Majority."



The piece in this book that stopped my heart was "Early Blur," a short, eloquent love poem. It has not been published online. You'll have to buy or borrow the book to read about "Mary of the late slant light of autumn."

Read more about God Particles on NPR.
Thomas Lux's bio at the Poetry Foundation.

Thursday, July 2, 2015

World Poetry: India

Happy Poetry Friday!


Thanks for hosting this week's poetry links,
Donna Smith. See you at Mainely Write!
It has taken me a few weeks to recover from process my trip to Italy last month. One month ago today, my two travelling companions and I were arriving in Salerno. We quickly settled into our B&B and set off through the narrow, cobbled streets of the city, to find the other poets.


Salerno's waterfront
Debby Kevin, me, and Ann Bracken
were at the conference
to represent Little Patuxent Review.

Ann, Debby, and I had come to Salerno for the first 100 Thousand Poets for Change World Conference. I've blogged about 100 TPC before, but this was my first time meeting other organizers. There were 80 of us from 21 countries!

When people ask about the trip, I can honestly say that the food was AMAZING, especially in Salerno. Since we were in old city Salerno, which is a port town just south of Amalfi, you can imagine that the sights were incredible. But the most important thing that I carried home with me is the friendships we made with other poets.

For the next few weeks, I am going to feature poets who live and work outside the U.S. or are immigrants to this country. Many of these poets are people I met in Salerno, but a few will be local authors who were born in other countries.

To kick off my World Poetry series, I'd like to welcome poet and journalist Menka Shivdasani, of Mumbai, India. At our first formal poetry reading in Salerno, Menka read an amazing feminist piece, "Hinge." 


Menka Shivdasani's third book of poems is
Safe House: A Poetrywala publication.
She is also the editor of If the Roof Leaks, Let it Leak:
A SPARROW publication (fourth in a series
of five volumes featuring Indian women
writers from 23 languages).
The two of us also had time during the conference to chat about our work in the schools and writing poetry with children. That's what we're going to focus on today.

Welcome, Menka!


Note from Menka Shivdasani
Coordinator, Mumbai, 100 Thousand Poets for Change

The 100 Thousand Poets for Change festival in Mumbai, which takes place over four days at the Kitab Khana bookstore, includes one programme for children every year, which is put together by Mrs. Rati Dady Wadia, former principal of Queen Mary School, and a teacher with more than 50 years' experience. She works with children across Mumbai schools to conduct poetry competitions based on themes of peace and sustainability, in tune with the themes of 100TPC. 
The children then present their poems publicly as part of the programme, in a session that includes music and theatre performances as well. Organisations such as The Writers' Bug have also expressed an interest in participating and some of their children had also shared their poems in 2014. [Check out The Writers' Bug website -- it's adorable!]
Last year, we asked children to write about India as well as about other countries for a session titled 'We are the World'. The titles are chosen in a way that children can relate to immediately, and they did, in fact, sing the popular song as well during the session.
While putting together this concept, I wanted children to start thinking about themselves as people who were proud to be Indian, but who also considered themselves as citizens of the world. The idea -- tenuous though it might seem to some -- was that if children started thinking of themselves as world citizens, they would be more amenable to the idea of peace between countries. 


The 2013 100TPC Music of the Spheres event,
photos courtesy of Menka Shivdasani.

This picture shows an enactment
of Gieve Patel's poem On Killing a Tree.
Watch a video about the poem here.
The first step towards this, in my view, was for them to become familiar with other countries and cultures. The children were free to write about whichever country they wished to, and many of them did some research before writing the poems, adding to their knowledge of other global regions. Some children even came to the presentation wearing costumes that represented the countries they were writing about.

When Mrs Wadia introduced the subject, this is what she said:
"India, the land of many religions and cultures – the land that nurtures so many diverse points of view and welcomes people from all walks of life; we are proud to be Indian but also believe that we are one with the world. Ours is a land that has been known for its tolerance over the centuries, and it is that makes India so special. We must all contribute towards keeping this ethos alive and not allow ulterior motives and political gain to overpower this amazing trait.
In a world that is increasingly getting divisive, we can learn to build bridges and break down walls."
She then brought in the concept of peace between countries, and of how it was important, even as we took pride in being Indian, to ensure that we lived in harmony with the rest of the world.

In the previous year, we had asked the children to write about nature and the environment, and these poems are represented in the book as well. The skit by Katie Bagli, 'The Earth Summit', which was performed by the children last year, brought in this theme too.

Menka and Mrs. Rati Dady Wadia
at Kitab Khana bookstore,
which hosted Mumbai's 100TPC poetry event.
Thank you, Menka, and Mrs. Wadia, for telling us about your poetry celebration. I'm pleased to be able to share a student poem from the book THE MUSIC OF THE SPHERES. Prachi Jain's poem "Rome" had special appeal for me because last month was my first visit to Italy. The poem made me think about the way certain places, especially historic ones, exist as a landscape in our minds -- even if we have not visited them.

ROME
by Prachi Jain
Activity High School, Class 9

What have you achieved if you have wandered earth's band
But never attempted to venture Rome's heavenly land?
The city with vast treasures of history
Which on Earth, indeed remains a mystery.

Nursed by a wolf -- two abandoned twins
Who great and fought to see who wins
Romulous stood over Remus, with pride and valour
And ruled over the land, showing off his glamour.

The picturesque city of Venice,
Where fires are breathed into every furnace
Where water flows from how to home
And gondolas row to every dome.

The Colosseum of Rome, known for its gladiator fights
Which today, is known as the land of lights.
It has an enormous underground circular base
The ruins of which still adorn the place.

So that's all I have got to say about Rome.
After all, I can only dream of it from home.
All I can do is persuade you to visit this scenic land
And while going, take me along, hand in hand.

Anthology of student poems written for 100 TPC


Thanks for visiting, Poetry Friday friends. If you have any questions or feedback for Menka, please leave them in the comments.

Enjoy this photo gallery from Rome. I hope Prachi has a chance to visit this city of wonders some day.

The Colosseum just before sunset.
Griffin doorknob in a Roman church

Modern art on the doors of
Santa Maria degli Angeli


Writerly sculpture at the Vatican museum

"Here there be dragons"
in the Vatican's Map Room

Wednesday, July 1, 2015

In Residence: Like a Rushing River

Thanks for all of your comments on my students' poems, readers! Today I am sharing the last set of third grade poems from Northfield Elementary.

It's always a gift to be invited to a school for poetry writing. Reading these poems says it all: When we put aside time for creative work that is not graded or judged on a rubric, but instead is given encouraging feedback for revision -- what wonders the students are capable of!

I'm very grateful to the PTA Cultural Arts Committee at Northfield E.S. and the Maryland State Arts Council for funding the grant that makes our month-long poetry residency possible.


Manga-style poet.
Untitled
by Stephanie G.

Mrs. Shovan should be president of poems.
She spent her time
to teach us poems.
She went in deep
inside her brain
to have us learn
about how to write poems.
She writes examples
of the poems
to help us understand.
She taught two million kids
with great thoughts and explanations.
She talks with a flow,
all calm and no madness.
And tells us some corrections
for us to make our poems better.


Highlighter bird.
Untitled
by Megan I.

Mrs. Shovan deserves a colossal
monument to remember her by.
Mrs. Shovan looks like a beautiful
young bride on her wedding day.
Mrs. Shovan's voice sounds like a songbird
singing in the early morning.
Mrs. Shovan, you are BOLD and BRAVE like a
soldier going into war.
Without you, I wouldn't understand poetry,
and that would be HORRIBLE!

Key art by Ryan and Ilana
Creativeness Is Key
by Ryan A. and Ilana M.

   When I am creative,
I am like Mrs. Shovan.
   I'm always thinking of fun and
bright ideas to write down next.
   Once I put them on what was a blank
piece of paper, I feel accomplished.
   We do exactly as Mrs. Shovan does,
and we are glad she had shown us her ways.
  The poems flow through my mind like
a rushing river. Mrs. Shovan has opened
poetry to the creative side of me.

Before and after cartoon by Jihoon
Mrs. Shovan Made Me Love Poetry
by Jihoon H.

In the beginning
I wasn't a fan
of poetry.
Since you came
you made me
love poetry.
You made me
do ode poetry,
list poetry,
and more.
You changed me.
Thank you Mrs. Shovan
for changing me
to love poetry!

Here is the complete "In Residence" series. Enjoy all of these great third grade poems -- you'll find descriptions of our workshops, too. Feel free to use these writing prompts and model poems in your own classroom.

First Student Responses: "Words in My Pet Goldfish," "Words in My Bed," "Words in My Life"
In Residence: Poetry Friday Words: Poems by Laura S., Jason Y., Jeffrey G., and Isa L.
In Residence: The Simile Zoo: Poems by Sabine S., Asher, Cecelia D., and Evelyn D.
In Residence: Day 2 in the Simile Zoo: Poems by Allie L., Makaela M., Parker P., Matthew L., Vincent T., Lila R., Naomi C., and Julia J.
In Residence: Due Stanze: Poems by Avery,  Setutsi, Jen, Anlan, Arushi, and Johanna.
In Residence: Opposite Poems: Poems by Andrew V., Matthew L., Nathan W., Aly A., and Joanna B.
In Residence at Today's Little Ditty: Poetry Postcard Summer Activity for Kids and Families
In Residence: Shoe Odes: Poems by  Ilana M., Nicole C., Dylan L., Linnea J., and Ben K. 
In Residence: A Book Filled with Poems: Shoe Odes by Julie B., Kayla K., Alexandria D., Brianna C., Arif V., and Rowan C
In Residence: Ode to Poetry: Poems by Noah B., Taylor S., Jackson M., and Mia P.

In Residence: Carry Me to Poetry Land: Poems by Andrew D., Rachel S., Julianna L., and Madison H.

Saturday, June 27, 2015

In Residence: Carry Me to Poetry Land

Happy weekend, Writerly Friends.

I am finishing up a long series called "In Residence." The posts cover what it's like to be a poet-in-residence in third grade (you'll find links to them at the bottom of this page). We've looked at everything to meeting the students and starting them off with a structured writing exercise, through several different workshops, culminating in the school's Poetry Open House.

These last few posts feature student poems that were written *after* the residency. The third grade team at Northfield Elementary had students write an additional ode or simile poem to put in a gift book for me.

Today's featured poets are Andrew D., Rachel S., Julianna L., and Madison H. Most of these poems are two pages long! I'm sharing my photos of the first pages, but you can read the rest of the poems to get the full effect.

Poem based on a model by Naomi Shihab Nye,
"Words in My Pillow"
from FALLING DOWN THE PAGE.
Words in Mrs. Shovan
by Andrew D.

Words in Mrs. Shovan.
She is not the word
but she is related
to the words
tall
smart
a good poet.
No one can touch them
but they relate to her.
Like a relates to an:
I and I'm
this and that.
These words are related.
If she's not here
she's somewhere
teaching other people
about
similes
opposites
lists
and ode poems.
She is the poem
just waiting to be read.
She helps people
discover how
amazing poetry is.

Andrew, my favorite lines are "If she's not here/ she's somewhere/ teaching other people ...."

We didn't work on epistolary poems,
but we did talk about how an ode could be written
to the object or person being described.
Our Mrs. Shovan
by Rachel S.

You, Mrs. Shovan,
have changed my thinking of poetry.
Adventures plus happy thoughts fill my head,
because of ht imagination you helped me set free.
The blowing wind carries me to Poetry Land
a place full of tenderness and poetry lovers.
If we had poetry for class,
I would jump, scream, and even dance.
That is how much I love poetry.
Wishing you never left was my dream!
The knowledge you taught me
flows through my body,
like a falling waterfall
softly brushing against the rocks behind it.
But life goes on
ans when you have to leave,
you leave.
You are the best poet I ever knew...
And the best in my heart.
Poetry sparkles like diamonds, I know.

Rachel, I hope the wind always blows you to Poetry Land. Your descriptions and similes definitely sparkle like diamonds!

We worked on using hyperbolic similes in our odes.
You can see that the students loved writing similes
that express their enthusiasm.
Ode to Mrs. Shovan
by Julianna L.

I don't know what I would
have done without you.
You taught me different types of
poems
List,
Ode,
Opposites,
Simile,
etc.
You feel poetry like a sunny day
on the beach.
You smell poetry, like the smell of
strawberry cake.
You see poetry like sparkling
diamonds in a dark, dark cave in the
middle of the night.
I ill bring this knowledge to all
the grades above.

Julianna, your description of poetry sparkling like diamonds in a dark cave -- wow! I hope you will always carry your love of poetry with you.

Madison's piece follows the format of
an opposite poem, one of the workshops
we did during our residency.
My Ideas of Poetry
by Madison H.

How I thought of poetry first:
I thought poetry
was going to be
more writing
and in my mind I said
BORING
I didn't see any
pizzaz
in poetry yet.

How I think of it now:
As soon as
I started
writing
I was in love with it.
My mom was surprised
how good I was at it
I now can do anything
in poetry
in my life.

Madison, I'm so glad you changed your mind about poetry. "Pizzaz" is a great word to describe how exciting it can be to read a poem that makes pictures in your mind.

Thanks again to the families who gave me permission to share their students' wonderful poems. Keep writing, Northfield poets!

In this Series:

First Student Responses: "Words in My Pet Goldfish," "Words in My Bed," "Words in My Life"
In Residence: Poetry Friday Words: Poems by Laura S., Jason Y., Jeffrey G., and Isa L.
In Residence: The Simile Zoo: Poems by Sabine S., Asher, Cecelia D., and Evelyn D.
In Residence: Day 2 in the Simile Zoo: Poems by Allie L., Makaela M., Parker P., Matthew L., Vincent T., Lila R., Naomi C., and Julia J.
In Residence: Due Stanze: Poems by Avery,  Setutsi, Jen, Anlan, Arushi, and Johanna.
In Residence: Opposite Poems: Poems by Andrew V., Matthew L., Nathan W., Aly A., and Joanna B.
In Residence at Today's Little Ditty: Poetry Postcard Summer Activity for Kids and Families
In Residence: Shoe Odes: Poems by  Ilana M., Nicole C., Dylan L., Linnea J., and Ben K. 
In Residence: A Book Filled with Poems: Shoe Odes by Julie B., Kayla K., Alexandria D., Brianna C., Arif V., and Rowan C

In Residence: Ode to Poetry: Poems by Noah B., Taylor S., Jackson M., and Mia P.

Thursday, June 25, 2015

In Residence: Ode to Poetry

Last week was an exciting time at the Shovan poetry pad. On Monday, I made my last visit to Northfield Elementary. Families came to share a poetry celebration. Since I'd last seen the third grade poets, they had been working on brand new poems! What a thrill when the students handed me a book filled with odes and simile poems about poetry and our residency.

On Thursday, I found out that an Advanced Reader's Copies of my middle grade novel, THE LAST FIFTH GRADE OF EMERSON ELEMENTARY, was delivered to my local independent bookstore. Beth at Green Row Books tweeted out a picture and got busy reading the book with her own fourth grade student.

A few days later, there was a package on our doorstep. Sam had to inspect it first. Inside: books!



I'm so excited that I'll be able to share THE LAST FIFTH GRADE with my friends at Northfield next year.

AND... I promise to post sign ups for a Poetry Friday ARC tour very soon!

This week's Poetry Friday links are at
Carol's Corner.
For the next few posts, I'm going to share some pages from the Northfield book of odes. 

I feel a little squeamish about sharing these poems. Many of them are odes written to me -- both lovely and a little embarrassing. However, I promised the Northfield students that I would share as many of their poems as I could. Today's poems are all by students whose work I have not featured yet.

In the poetry teacher similes, I have been compared to everything from a smart dolphin to a hungry owl. I appreciate the compliments, but I appreciate the hard work that went into these similes and odes even more.



Ode to Poetry
by Noah B.

Poetry is persuasive
and organized
because it is neat.
Poetry is epic
and terrific
because you work hard.
Poetry is rich
and yummy
because it is a
piece of cake.
Poetry is awesome because
the best poetry teacher
in the world
taught us
Mrs. Shovan.

Dolphin Teacher: Class we will be writing poems.
Dolphin Students: Yes, Yes

Dolphin Teacher
by Taylor S.

Mrs. Shovan is
like a dolphin.

Dolphins are smart
like you are
they love to learn
like you love.
You love to be
by people
and dolphins like to
play with other dolphins.
You also love to teach kids
like dolphins teach their babies.



Shovan is like an Owl
by Jackson M.

Mrs. Shovan is like an owl.
She is very smart and hungry
for well done poems written for her.
Her prey is still being worked on. Once I finish,
she wolfs down the wrong answer
and checks the right answers.
Then, she gives it back to me,
covered in pen, slobber, and ink.



Sunny Poet
by Mia P.

Mrs. Shovan is like an ice cream cone.
She is sweet and enjoying.

Mrs. Shovan is like a panda.
Kind and caring

Mrs. Shovan is like a warm sunny day.
She makes you happy.

Mrs. Shovan is like a hug.
She makes you feel good inside.

My heart is melting!

In this series:

First Student Responses: "Words in My Pet Goldfish," "Words in My Bed," "Words in My Life"
In Residence: Poetry Friday Words: Poems by Laura S., Jason Y., Jeffrey G., and Isa L.
In Residence: The Simile Zoo: Poems by Sabine S., Asher, Cecelia D., and Evelyn D.
In Residence: Day 2 in the Simile Zoo: Poems by Allie L., Makaela M., Parker P., Matthew L., Vincent T., Lila R., Naomi C., and Julia J.
In Residence: Due Stanze: Poems by Avery,  Setutsi, Jen, Anlan, Arushi, and Johanna.
In Residence: Opposite Poems: Poems by Andrew V., Matthew L., Nathan W., Aly A., and Joanna B.
In Residence at Today's Little Ditty: Poetry Postcard Summer Activity for Kids and Families
In Residence: Shoe Odes: Poems by  Ilana M., Nicole C., Dylan L., Linnea J., and Ben K. 

In Residence: A Book Filled with Poems: Shoe Odes by Julie B., Kayla K., Alexandria D., Brianna C., Arif V., and Rowan C

Thursday, June 18, 2015

In Residence: A Book Filled with Poems

Happy Poetry Friday, Writerly Friends!


This week's Poetry Friday host is
Mary Lee Hahn at A Reading Year.
Thanks, Mary Lee, for kicking off our summer!
On Monday, I said arrivederci to the third grade poets at Northfield Elementary School. They held a poetry open house with readings for families and friends. Thank you to all of the parents and poetry supporters who filled the third grade classrooms. It was quite a celebration!

There was a big surprise for me. While I was in Italy, the students put together a book of poems.



The poems inside are odes and lists and extended similes. Each one is about what the students like about writing poetry, why they enjoy working with me, and their favorite parts of the residency.




I was overwhelmed by all of the third graders' amazing cartoons and equally amazing poems. But even more so, I love their generosity of spirit. So many students have come to love poetry as much as I do, and they're loud and proud about it.





I will post some poems from this book next week. For today, I have a few more third grade shoe odes to wear ... I mean, to SHARE.

Here are shoe odes by poets Julie B., Kayla K., Alexandria D., Brianna C., Arif V., and Rowan C.


Julie B.

My shoes smell like chocolate.
They keep my feet comfortable and warm when
I walk the mall.
My shoe is black as night.
It’s soft like a memory foam pillow.
It’s squeaky like a rubber duck.
I don’t want to be barefooted because
I don’t want my feet to be hot
like a fire breathing dragon
or cold like an ice bear.

Dragon Shoes at SheFinds,
they're hot stuff!
Kayla K.

The Ode to My Shoes

I couldn’t live without my shoes
because they’re so comfy, it’s like
putting your feet into bags of fluffy
marshmallows! My shoes sound like
“thump, thump, thump… click, click,
CLACK!” Like a clock ticking as
I walk around the whole day. My shoe
smells like green grass and dirt
mixed together. My shoes look like
a rainbow parrot flying in the blue
sky. I’ve been to North Carolina,
on the deck, to the store, at
the beach. But now they’re very rough
and worn out from taking me everywhere
I go.

Shoes for time travelers from Fanboy Fashion.
Alexandria D.

Ode to My Shoes

My shoes look like a pink butterfly
fluttering through the air.
My shoes smell like the taste of an unwashed apple.
My shoes feel smooth and squishy on the inside.
My shoes sound like a bear’s claws
walking through the smooth floors.
I have been to the mall in my shoes. I dream
of going to Paris in my shoes.
I can’t live without my shoes because I
walk around in them and they help me
run.

In these shoes, your feet will have wings. From Etsy.
Brianna C.

Ode to My Blue Vans

You look like the blue jays swiftly
flying across the blue skies.

You feel like petting the soft blue
feathers of a blue jay.
You feel like a handful of marshmallows
when I slide my foot in you.

You sound like the kids of the
marching band in a parade.

I would even dream of bringing
you with me to Hawaii.

I can’t ever live without you
because you keep my feet
comfortable and cozy when I
wear you.

Hand painted blue-feathered Vans from Pinterest.
Arif V.

I can’t live without my shoes
because I would’ve gotten 5,000
blisters.

You look like a cheetah and
help me run faster.

My shoes are as stinky as
a garbage can full of bad caramel ice cream.
This helps my opponents cover
their noses and I can defend
myself.

You have helped me to score
six goals without getting six
blisters. You gave me confidence
to score them.

You are really fuzzy like a
cat and help me keep calm.

You are like two hands and
one clapping the floor at a time.

Cheetah kicks from The Shoe Game.
Rowan C.

Ode to My Shoe

My shoe, like a jet black comet soaring
through the cloudy gray sky, a major, exciting
unpredicted thing for the day. It smells
like a garbage disposal, bad enough for all the
bullies to keep at least twenty paces away
from me, and feels like hard rubber. It sounds
like a mouse squeaking when I got down the halls. They
have [walked] all the way through Philly, from Walnut
Street to Independence Hall. I couldn’t live without

my shoes, because my feet would fall off.

You'll feel like a shooting star in these flip-flops.
Thanks to my wonderful third grade poets at Northfield Elementary for making my day, my week, my year with their poems. It's amazing to watch all of you grow, experiment with, and share my enthusiasm for poetry.



I'll be back next week with selections from the Northfield E.S. book of poetry.



In this series:

First Student Responses: "Words in My Pet Goldfish," "Words in My Bed," "Words in My Life"
In Residence: Poetry Friday Words: Poems by Laura S., Jason Y., Jeffrey G., and Isa L.
In Residence: The Simile Zoo: Poems by Sabine S., Asher, Cecelia D., and Evelyn D.
In Residence: Day 2 in the Simile Zoo: Poems by Allie L., Makaela M., Parker P., Matthew L., Vincent T., Lila R., Naomi C., and Julia J.
In Residence: Due Stanze: Poems by Avery,  Setutsi, Jen, Anlan, Arushi, and Johanna.
In Residence: Opposite Poems: Poems by Andrew V., Matthew L., Nathan W., Aly A., and Joanna B.
In Residence at Today's Little Ditty: Poetry Postcard Summer Activity for Kids and Families
In Residence: Shoe Odes: Poems by  Ilana M., Nicole C., Dylan L., Linnea J., and Ben K.